Anxiety Treatment — San Jose, CA and Campbell

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Living in the heart of Silicon Valley and Santa Clara county, the clinicians at Uplift Psychology Group are no stranger to working long hours and feeling anxious and/or stressed. When a work-life balance is not maintained, the impact can be extensive and lead to other health issues in the professional and personal realms.

At Uplift Psychology Group, you can expect your clinician to address stress management and help find long term solutions to address your overall anxiety and stress. We examine coping tools and self-care strategies to help you regain the balance in your work and personal life.

Anxiety therapy in San Jose to Help You Live Beyond Worry

It is easy to feel burdened down with a load of care when our worries hit and overwhelm us. There are moments in your life where a worry can strike out of the blue and knock you flat, but it’s often more common for small, everyday worries to gradually wear you down and erode your defenses.

When we meet with our patients, we have a variety of coping techniques that we can share to help ease the very-real pain of worry and dissatisfaction. Although we individualize our approach for each person, the following are examples of some methods you can take to relieve your generalized anxiety and focus one healing and happiness.

Treating Anxiety With Meditation

Meditation, whether guided or self-directed, is an excellent way to calm the mind and relieve stress. Meditation has been used for millennia as a way to assuage fears, lower your heart rate and breathing, and ease tension.

The steps to meditate are simple, but it may take some time to get used to it. First, you sit or lie comfortably—comfort is paramount, so that you can free your mind of any physical problems. Close your eyes—shut out the world and tune out your surroundings. Don’t go out of way to control your breath—don’t count your breaths—just try to breathe as naturally as you can and let it come. Then you can do a variety of things. You can try to clear your head of all thoughts and just be, or you can go the other direction and try to concentrate on a single thought, point, or feeling.

Meditation can lead to lower blood pressure, improved circulation, lower heart rate, slower breathing, less anxiety, less stress, relaxation, and a general feeling of well-being.

To dive into meditation on your own you can find many guided meditations available for free on YouTube, or elsewhere on the internet, or simply listen to peaceful music, white noise, or running water.

Physical Exercise

Many people think that the only exercise that relieves stress is yoga, and while yoga is great and encouraged, any physical activity can do wonders for your well-being. You may have heard of the so-called “runner’s high.” That’s merely an endorphin rush (the “feel-good” neurotransmitters) that runners get when they’re working out. Running makes them feel good. A sense of euphoria takes over which affects athletes and casual exercisers alike.

But physical activity can be a kind of meditation on its own. As you jog or walk or stretch or play, your mind lets go of its worries and you focus all of your attention on the repetitive motion of your feet on the ground, the way your arms swish back and forth, or the concentration on balance and energy. This helps your mind get to a simpler place where day-to-day stressors seem more trivial and pleasure is easier to find.

Therapy Through Journaling

Journaling might not sound relaxing—it might bring up thoughts of counting calories, tracking steps, marking off hard-to-reach goals—but there are benefits to journaling that go beyond just keeping a manifest of your day. Journaling can serve as an escape or emotional release. It lets you spill out your worries in a safe way, similar to talk therapy, that doesn’t lead to harm or injury to anyone else. It forces you to focus on self-awareness and work through your troubling thoughts and stressors.

Journaling has been scientifically shown to get rid of negative thoughts. In one 2011 Psychological Science study, participants wrote down their personal thoughts and then threw the paper away and results found a significant decrease in stress. A 2006 study in the journal of the American Medical Association found that patients who struggled with chronic illness, who wrote about their issues, found a physical lessening of their symptoms and pain, compared to those who did not journal.

Focusing on What You Have Control Over

By changing your ways of thinking to focus not on the big, uncontrollable problems, but on the things that you can actually manage, you’re better able to relieve your stress and worry. It may be tempting to focus on the big unknowns in life, but your more likely to find personal peace by focusing on the smaller, more specific and narrower factors that affect your day-to-day well-being.

By choosing to seek help for anxiety disorders and your general mental health, you’re choosing to ease your worries and pains. But these stress-management techniques can be a great place to start if you’re looking for help in the day-to-day.

Get the Help You Need Today at Uplift Psychology Group — Call or text for your free 15 minute consultation at 408-680-4114.